The Use of Neuroscience Interventions for Caregivers

Jack Paul Gesino, DSW, LCSW
5 CECs
Friday, April 13, 2018
9:00 am – 3:30 pm

This seminar satisfies the continuing education requirement for content on military members, veterans and their families.

Location: Hartford Public Library (Room 026), 500 Main St, Hartford CT

Click here for fee and payment information

Caregivers for elders, veterans, and children experience significant stress and have higher rates of depression, anxiety and numerous stress-related medical illnesses. Their brains begin to experience a sense of constant threat, often overwhelming the sympathetic nervous system and impairing the hippocampus (problems with attention/concentration/memory),  prefrontal cortex (problems in decision making), and limbic system(overwhelming feelings/emotions).

Frequently, interventions for caregivers are a “top down” (cognitive) approach. Knowledge acquired from interpersonal neurobiology; social neuroscience; and affective neuroscience can be utilized for creating positive neural changes. These changes are the basis for building resilience in human functioning, specifically for caregivers, and positively effecting changes in brain health including decreasing limbic reactivity, increasing positive emotions, increasing motivation, increasing serotonin, dopamine and oxytocin. Helping caregivers using a variety of neurobiological interventions can be “transformative in mind and body” leading to relational integrity with their family member and aligning them with the larger community of care. A leap for social justice, of an often-maligned group of heroes, Family Caregivers.

This seminar will enable participants to:

  • gain an understanding of interpersonal neurobiology; social neuroscience; and affective neuroscience that can be used for creating positive change
  • learn how these changes are the basis for building resilience in human functioning, specifically for caregivers
  • review interventions in as effort to help caregivers experience a “transformation in mind and body”